Monthly Archives: December 2022

I Wish I Could Say We Were Kicked Back Drinking Champaign on our 32nd Anniversary…

But my amazing and dedicated spouse is outside rescuing our trees from dense snowfall so full of water we keep hearing the echoing cracks of tree branches all over the neighborhood as they give way.

He spent two hours shoveling snow off the roof this afternoon and keeps stomping around tonight muttering words of doom. But that’s not a whole lot different than every other new year since we have lived in a high desert valley at 5,000 feet below a 9,000 foot mountain peak. I just had to have the bright idea to marry my sweetheart at midnight on 1 – 1 – 91, not giving one thought to a future where we live in a place that makes celebrating wedded bliss in winter difficult. So, it wouldn’t be ringing in the New Year without listening to the beloved grumbling, then tucking the stressed out grumbler into bed by 8:30, so I can stay up and maybe catch my sister on Facetime at midnight.

I love you honey! Here’s to 32 amazing years. And retirement will be in a place where there is no snow to shovel… I promise.

P.S. I’m having a hard time writing this coherently because despite it all, he never misses an opportunity to crack open a bottle of champaign. So, when I say, “I wish I could say WE were kicked back drinking champaign,” it means ME. He’s shoveling more snow and worrying about our giant elm crashing down on us. I hear him coming back inside. Yep… that’s him now calling our tree service… sounds like they’re having a busy night.

I’m raising my glass to all! Here’s to a fabulous new year full of exciting times and ordinary moments we can cherish!

Have you Ever Worked Furiously on a Short Story Submission, and Nearly Missed the Deadline?

Still, I managed it with fifteen minutes to spare! And I hadn’t even figured out the title yet. Yikes! My closest call yet. I had the deadline wrong. I’m typing away and thought I should check the submission requirements again. Due in Two Hours! What!! The story that resulted still has me reeling. I love it so much, I don’t even care if it doesn’t get a win. It is dear to my heart, and that is all that matters.

The prompt was to write a dystopian tale using the first sentence, “The outside world was unknown to her, but she could see a glimpse of it through the window in his room.” I couldn’t resist this one! It’s short. Eight minutes to read. I’d love to know if it captures your imagination, too, only if you have a few minutes to spare, and need a dose of magic. If you do, click the photo.

A lonely man in a dying world seizes a chance at happiness with a mythical being.

The outside world was unknown to her, but she could see a glimpse of it through the window in his room. The view from this high place included a blue sky interrupted by puffy white clouds tipped in pink from the rising sun, and their shadows moved swiftly over a patch of turbulent sea. That spot was the focus of her longing.

It was the vast land flowing away from the sea that comprised the unknown, the part of this world she had never experienced until now, the part that required a pair of feet to traverse it. She looked at her toes in wonder, curling them just to ensure it was her will operating the strange appendages.

Great Reads by a Fellow Blogger- Enjoy! The Chronicles Of History – A Year In Review: The Top Ten Post of 2022

This year has been a very quick one. 2022 swept by in a blink of an eye and I can barely believe that we are about to enter 2023.  Today will be a …

The Chronicles Of History – A Year In Review: The Top Ten Post of 2022

A Little Cannibal Comedy, Anyone?

I dare you to ride along with the masked passengers and their eerie pilot in this story that came from a random prompt in a genre you don’t get …

A Little Cannibal Comedy, Anyone?

Richie’s Fantasy Writers’ Toolshed – Awesome Authors Sharing Tips! All in One Place!

Author Interviews now in a Playlist from the Fantasy Writer’s Toolshed Podcast . Here’s the latest. Thanks, Richie!

Browsing Vocal Media for Engaging Short Stories?

I’m there. I would love you to stop by and check out my growing and eclectic set of short stories. Fantasy fiction, an adult fairy tale, a romance triangle with a twist, a pair of aquarium fish who witness murdering mayhem, a historical fiction tale of a pioneering aeronaut, and even a cannibal comedy with an ending that will raise your brows, await you. If you enjoy them, like and comment while you’re there. Thank you!

Click on image to visit my profile and stories.

Now tell me…Whose Husbands Give Them a Badass Knife for Story Inspiration? Mine Does…

First off, I live in a state where these are legal to own. My husband is a blade expert. And he’s the best story collaborator any writer could have. …

Now tell me…Whose Husbands Give Them a Badass Knife for Story Inspiration? Mine Does…

A Leap Through the Elder Oak, The Conclusion

By D. L. Lewellyn

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A Leap Through the Elder Oak, Conclusion

Once again, Ray found himself dodging arrows as he leapt over fallen trees and ducked behind live ones. Tsealie would say it was a miracle he hadn’t been poked full of holes long before now. The elves were lethal with their uncanny aim and inhuman strength that sent the arrows flying so close, his skin prickled where they passed.

Another missile whipped by his face, splitting a small birch tree in two ahead of him, right where he’d been about to turn. He spun on his heels and changed direction as he cursed his hair that glowed like a silver beacon in the growing darkness of the shortest day of the year. He’d set out wearing a gnome hat Tsealie’s daughter had modified for him. The conical hat…

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A Leap Through the Elder Oak, The Conclusion

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A Leap Through the Elder Oak, Conclusion

Once again, Ray found himself dodging arrows as he leapt over fallen trees and ducked behind live ones. Tsealie would say it was a miracle he hadn’t been poked full of holes long before now. The elves were lethal with their uncanny aim and inhuman strength that sent the arrows flying so close, his skin prickled where they passed.

Another missile whipped by his face, splitting a small birch tree in two ahead of him, right where he’d been about to turn. He spun on his heels and changed direction as he cursed his hair that glowed like a silver beacon in the growing darkness of the shortest day of the year. He’d set out wearing a gnome hat Tsealie’s daughter had modified for him. The conical hat was absurd on such a tall man, but it disguised his humanness and used magical camouflage to make him disappear into nature.

It worked until the cap was snatched by a branch about a half mile back as he traversed a dangerous patch of woods. Not long after, the elf prince and his guard picked up his trail. Thwack! Another arrow lodged in a tree, this time taking a piece of him first. Ray reached behind his neck and felt the wetness of his blood. Another inch and the force would have taken his head.

Before this fateful jaunt into the bizarre, Ray had wished for more excitement in his life. Dropping into the realm of a supernatural race who did not welcome the intrusion wasn’t what he had in mind. Was leaving here too much to ask? He considered throwing himself on the mercy of the elf king. He’d meant what he said when he told Tsealie this was the last time he would risk the gnomes.

If he hadn’t broken so many laws when he first arrived, Tsealie might have managed to negotiate a sponsorship with King Seabrin, which might have gotten him home at the start of this venture. But laws were very different here, and the elves had little tolerance for law breakers, even if they were unwitting ones. Attempting negotiations was too dangerous a prospect for the lesser gnome kingdom to undertake. Once Ray learned about his situation, he refused to let Tsealie try.

He stumbled through a patch of thorny brush and almost fell on his face. He’d lost more blood than he realized, and his vision blurred. He didn’t even let himself dwell on the pain. Too many other worries crowded his mind, like making it to the portal before he passed out. He should try to staunch the blood. The elves had gone silent, which meant he had no idea how close they were, but he needed to rest a minute and bind his wound.

An opening between a spot of thick brush and a boulder provided cover while he crouched on the pungent forest floor and listened for signs of his pursuers. An owl hooted. Something skittered through his hiding spot, followed by another skitter. Twigs snapped under heavier steps. The prince was closer than he thought. As he listened, his vision cleared enough to make out his surroundings in the fading light. His heart thumped at what he saw.

He’d made it back to the Forest of the Fire Maidens and was in the middle of the ancient copse of yews Tsealie described. Ray knew what he must search for next, but he stayed hidden a little longer to drink his fill of water from the gourd on his belt. He used some to wash the blood from his hands, listened again, then pushed on in a direction away from the elves.

He only had to go another hundred yards before he spotted the mound of granite towering over a moonlit meadow, his last marker. An ethereal voice echoed between the trees. “If you don’t halt and turn yourself in, human, it will go worse for you.”

Of course, he kept going. He was so close; the sound of his wife’s laughter rang in his head. She was always ready to laugh, and it was the sweetest sound on earth. It beckoned him and hope gave him strength and stealth, so when he sprinted the last few yards, he made no sound.

He leapt over a log and vaulted around the monolithic rock, then stumbled to a halt. Ray had hashed out every detail of the epic solstice battle with Tsealie the past few days, but it hadn’t prepared him for the sight that met his eyes. Two trees, so tall they blocked the deepening starlight, swung their branches at each other as if they were swords. Their clashes thundered across the clearing, and electricity made its own noise as it crackled between them, growing in intensity.

He couldn’t make out faces because there weren’t any, but he imagined their expressions all the same, and it was clear the giant trees engaged in a fierce competition. One minute, they seemed rooted to the ground, the next, they would raise a gnarled root and step forward with another jab.

Movement caught his eye. It was an opening in the hollow of one of the warring trees, the Elder Oak, and it shimmered in an out of existence. His theory was correct. The portal wasn’t fixed in one spot, it moved around to meet certain conditions. And he watched those conditions unfold in a traditional clash that heralded winter. He calculated the war would end in about twenty minutes.

Before he could make his move, a beam of light blinded him, obscuring the snorting creature rearing up and blocking his path. A stag. He had to leap out of the way and barely managed to stay on his feet.

On the stag’s back was a fierce-looking blue-haired elf with a crown on his head that appeared to be made of water. The glowing being spoke in a deep voice. “Where do you think you are going, human? Do you really believe we would let you return without making you pay for your crimes?”

“My only crime is believing I was smart enough to know what I was doing with the portal. I admit conducting my experiment was the worst decision of my life. I only want to return to my family. I haven’t caused any harm here. Please let me go back.”

“It is the harm you might cause when you return that we are concerned with, and none of this is for you to decide. It is up to the king.” His brows drew together. “There is one possibility that might earn you your freedom.”

“What do you mean?”

“The human who seems set on discovering his way here must be stopped. The king will send you home after you help us with this problem.” 

“I’ve already been missing for six years. Longer is unthinkable.”

“It is either this or be locked away and never go home again.” Ray decided he had another choice and searched for his opportunity to make a run for the ancient oak.

Then, he got help when a familiar sapphire prism pierced the darkness, and snow began to fall. It fell so heavy it soon covered every surface, piling high. The blanketing quiet brought to the fore the sounds of clashing branches. Only a few feet separated Ray from his family.

An owl flew at the prince, flapping its wings around the stag’s head. The stag reared up, this time in defense, nearly unseating the prince. More owls swooped over the guards.

Ray recognized the cues given to him by a wizened old gnome to point him towards another leap of faith. In the winged chaos, he made a zigzag dash, then dove headfirst at the shimmering hollow while the king of the oak trees dueled with the Holly King, both giants oblivious to the drama playing out beneath them.

As he tumbled through a denser darkness than the one now shrouding Undine on the winter solstice, he sent his heartfelt gratitude to a tiny being who had turned out to be the best friend he ever had.

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A Leap Through the Elder Oak, Part Three

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A Leap Through the Elder Oak, Part Three

The six-foot four human had given up applying science to the phenomenon of his two-foot-high companion covering distances faster than him, while appearing to stroll. His efforts these days went to keeping pace with the being who barely topped his knee. He was used to the strangeness now, so he was able to listen as they walked and Tsealie explained.

“It will be a process because as kings, the giant trees can move among their subjects. However, there are only so many locations that will accommodate their size, and as you pointed out, the locations are part of the tradition.”

His dark eyes glittered. “I am hopeful we can get you to the right one in time. I will alert the network at once. Then, you, my friend, will need to be ready to dodge the elves and make it there in one piece.” 

When Ray’s face filled with determination, Tsealie said, “Did I ever tell you that you could pass for an Ice Elf with that platinum hair? Especially when your eyes turn steely.”

“You mentioned it a time or two. And if I were to stay longer in this world, I would like to meet the race whose history my ancestors in Scandinavia might very well share, if my theory is correct.”

The two of them continued on, rounding yet another bend in the tunnel, and the yeasty fumes of mushroom ale invaded Ray’s nostrils. He rolled his shoulders and relaxed, inhaling deeper. His favorite soup was on the menu this afternoon. Leek and lentil. Prior to living with these diminutive beings of nature, Ray had been steadfast in his belief he wouldn’t survive on greenery and legumes, though his wife often tried to convince him to go vegetarian with her. It turned out he thrived on the savory concoctions the gnomes liberally dished out.

Tsealie’s smile thinned out his wrinkles. You know I will miss your stories and our games. But I wish this for you as hard as you wish it for yourself.”

“I know you do, Tsealie. And I have a feeling once I’m home, it won’t be long before I will want to come back for a visit, though I can’t see how that might happen. Do you?”

“Before you stumbled unwittingly through a Fae portal and wandered into the fern gardens to trample over my herd of snails, I would have thought not. But with you Raymond Jensen, anything is possible.”

Ray blanched at his words, even as he accepted the humor in them. “I still feel awful about the snails. At least you stopped me before my carelessness grew to unforgivable proportions.”

At last, they arrived at a set of double doors carved out of thick elm. A pair of gnomes, even shorter than their elder, and dignified in their sapphire livery complete with tall, conical caps, made way for them, then stood at attention. Guards were not a requirement in this peaceful realm deep under the earth. The little sentinels made themselves available in this fashion, seeming to appear from thin air, out of respect for Tsealie, who was the oldest among them.

But Tsealie’s age was another logic-bending mystery Ray decided long ago not to spend time puzzling over, so he pushed that last thought aside and bent in half to enter the Great Hall Under the Elm. Thanks to the hollow in the giant tree widening out to unbelievable proportions below ground, he could rise to his full height after squeezing through the door.

Since learning today about the symbiotic relationship between the trees and the gnomes, Ray took time to glance around the natural architecture with new eyes. He let the raucous noise fade away and listened to the sounds of the earth. A trick Tsealie taught him. An array of burls had been turned into small windows that staggered up the great height of the tree, and the dust moted beams of light bathed his face.

Part of him had been aware of the aura glowing off the surfaces of the underground kingdom, but now he could feel the rhythm of life that encompassed more than the tiny people.

Tsealie waited, as if he understood Ray’s need to absorb this new perspective of his surroundings. Then, the elder’s stomach rumbled loud enough to break the spell, and the hall turned lively once again.

Ray smiled and said, “I could use a meal, too. But even more urgent is the need to indulge in at least three pints, and a board game or two to calm me down. You’ve given me my first real hope today.”

“Your clever scientific investigations did that,” Tsealie said as they headed through the throng of citizens, all wearing the signature pointed hat, whether male or female. “Now let’s eat, so we can get to our next round of Lanard. You promised to leave me with a strategy memorable enough to be chronicled in the archives.”

Just then, a sentinel appeared as if out of thin air. His cap was askew, and his eyes were round as he said, “Prince Jonpril’s men are investigating much too close to our entrance, Tsealie. Linton is bolstering the shields.”

Tsealie laid a hand on his guard’s shoulder. “Thank you, Peddrie. You best go back and help him.” It appeared as if the miniature person turned and walked away, but he was simply no longer there. Ray blinked. He still wasn’t used to that.

Ray said, “The winter solstice cannot come soon enough this year for the Sapphire Gnomes. If I don’t make it, Tsealie, I will turn myself in.”

To be continued… stay tuned for the conclusion tomorrow! December 24, 2022.

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Sunday Spotlight – Artist and Teacher Audrey Markowitz

By D. L. Lewellyn

D.I could talk all day about your teaching and how wonderful you are at motivating and supporting those around you. That is my experience with you, Audrey. But this is my opportunity to dig into what motivates you. What gets your creative juices flowing?

A. Whether I’m putting a new class together as an art teacher, or working on an art piece for myself, I’m motivated by different things. As a teacher, it’s the desire to get my students excited about a new project, a new technique, a new medium, new tools, etc. that motivates me. Knowing that people are growing as artists and becoming more confident in their ability is what drives me to create classes.

I start with a project that interests me and one in which I feel there will be lots of learning opportunities. I create the piece of art that I will teach probably…

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A Leap Through the Elder Oak, Part Two

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A Leap Through the Elder Oak, Part Two

The gnome stopped walking and spoke in his stern elder voice, gripping his staff hard enough to make the faceted sapphire cast its prisms over the tunnel. “You must have risked capture more than usual today, Raymond, to be the benefactor of so much information. You will want to be extra cautious next time you go topside. The elves might set a trap. They also might realize it is the Sapphire Gnomes  guarding the whereabouts of the human who evades them.”

When Ray opened his mouth to speak, Tsealie held up a hand. “That is all I have to say about that. I’ve taken the usual precautions to hide your tracks. As for the ruby, it is said to be a bloodred stone the size of a man’s fist and in the possession of the Siren of the Undine Sea Caves. If any mortal should survive the vicious tides that rise up at her will and all her other cruel tricks to reach the stone, they will gain immortality.”

Ray said, “From what I know of this man, that would fit with his purpose.”

Tsealie snorted and once again sounded like a carefree gnome. “First, the stone is a myth and not even the Undine Elves believe it exists. Second, humans without a Fae sponsor who are ignorant of the supernatural kingdoms have never found their way here.” He gave Ray the side eye. “Until you. And lastly, the siren who allegedly possesses the stone is deadly to all who cross her path, not just feeble humans.” He caught Ray’s eye again. “No offense.”

Ray laughed. “I am the first to admit to my human weaknesses.” Then, his jaw clenched, and his voice turned serious. “I don’t care what this man is close to doing. Let him risk himself over a grab at immortality. The king can worry about keeping him out. My only purpose is to get home to my family.” 

He inhaled, then let his breath out slowly. “Even though I’ve lived in Undine through the changing of seven seasons and witnessed many incredible things, as a dedicated scientist, I’m struggling to embrace the idea I must find a pair of ancient battling trees if I want to get home.”

“Well, my friend. That may be something I can help you with.”

“You have a way to locate them?”

“The trees and gnomes cannot exist without each other. Do you see what makes up these walls? He gestured around them as they moved again along the winding tunnel. “The interlocking roots are lifelines to the tree kingdom and the gnomes not only shelter within them, but care for them. The problem we will have this time of year is getting the kings’ attention because the two will be focused only on their relentless competition.”

He peered at Ray from under his pointy cap. “It’s not like they will ever be allowed to rule on their respective wrong sides of the year. That would defy the laws of nature. One king must always give way to the other every solstice. But they never stop trying. And they certainly won’t be bothered with human problems while they are at it.”

“They don’t have to be. The portal’s energy will be affected by the clashing kings, opening and closing as the season passes to the victor. I just have to be in the right place at the right time. I’ve waited so long, only to learn my window of opportunity is slim. If I’m too late, I’ll have to wait another year, or find another way.”

“It’s not like you to be negative, Raymond. Just think, you might have discovered this after the solstice. But how in the name of the Sapphire Imp did you figure it out?”

“Believe me, I am just as flabbergasted. But this wonderous place has taught me that science and magic are not so different. They operate on the same principles. And it all starts with miniscule elements that comprise what human scientists call atoms, which form molecules, which cause reactions to the energy around us. An example of that is what will happen at the site of this traditional battle.” 

Ray stopped and laid a hand on the small shoulder. “So, how will we find them, Tsealie?”

To be continued…

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A Leap Through the Elder Oak – A Winter Solstice Fantasy Story

A scientist who stumbles accidentally into a realm that defies the laws of physics (or does it?) might finally be close to getting back home to his wife and daughter.

I wrote this story for a private community blog whose members are dedicated to writing every day, starting with the Winter Solstice and into the Spring Equinox. Since I am sharing in installments there, I thought I’d do the same here, delivering the ending on Christmas Eve. I adapted a deleted chapter from one of my novels in progress to a Winter Solstice themed short story, and was thrilled to find the perfect home for it. I hope you enjoy Part 1.

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A Leap Through the Elder Oak, Part One

Ray Jensen pounded through the trees, then leapt with blind faith into the hole as an arrow whizzed past his ear. The opening sealed over his head like it never existed, as he dropped thirty feet. 

Experience taught him the precise point at which to fold his tall body for the landing, and he hit the ground, rolled over the floor covered in thick straw, and came to a breathless halt against a boulder. 

He coughed and spat out a mouthful of dirt. Just once, he would like to enter the realm of the Sapphire Gnomes without coming close to breaking his neck.

His eyes landed on a pair of Antlered Hare boots and the bottom of a crooked staff. The voice above them said, “You’re quite good at that. And I can see it was necessary.”

The wizened gnome beckoned to Ray with his sapphire-topped staff as the human rose to his full height, his joints protesting this latest drop with a few popping sounds. The tall man stooped to allow the very small Fae to swipe at his cheek with a thumb, which he drew back to show it was covered in blood, then he shook his head.

Ray smiled and said, “I’m only as good as your charm over that entrance, Tsealie. I never have to doubt it will work.” He held up a moss-colored stone, flipped it in the air, and caught it.

Tsealie said with the eagerness of a true friend, “Were you successful?”

“Yes. I confirmed two important things. My theory is correct about my arrival being somewhere within the Forest of the Fire Maidens. And I found out that the king sent his youngest son to investigate the human who has been attempting to cross the same portal, using my invention. But the elves had me on the run before I could find the exact location.

Optimism crept into his voice. “When I locate the Elder Oak, who will battle with the Holly King at the winter solstice, it should be the answer to my problem. I was so close, Tsealie. But it wouldn’t have done me any good because as a non-magic user, I need help from the tree kings four days from now. Not today. If only I hadn’t wandered so far when you found me. I might have been home long before now.”

“I’ve told you many times it was a miracle an uninvited human survived the hazards of the Realm after wandering dazed over such a staggering distance. It is another miracle you’ve been here all this time without being discovered, and your odds lower with each search.” Tsealie made sure to admonish him in this vein every time he returned from an investigation, and Ray took it for the worry it was.

The gnome tossed in a little hope with his dire words. “It’s a relief you made it back today, so you can prove me wrong again. And I’m thinking your latest efforts might indeed lead to your success. But it seems King Seabrin has upped the security.”

“I agree. I believe it means the arrogant human he’s trying to keep out and who is responsible for trapping me here discovered something that amped up his attempts.”

By now the two of them were walking along a tunnel, the walls of which were thick with fat intertwining roots polished to a shine. The warm wood gleamed from every spot not covered by all manner of green lichen and white moonflowers. Oil lanterns lit their way with a pleasant orange glow.

“How long do you reckon I’ve been here, Tsealie?”

“You’re the physicist. What do you think?” Tsealie’s voice was not unkind. He simply didn’t want to give an answer that would cause his friend pain.

Ray heaved out a sigh. “Though it has only been two years in the Undine Realm, I calculate six have passed on the other side. My little girl has grown up… And I missed it.”

“I am sorry, Raymond.” To Tsealie, Ray was Raymond from the start. No one ever called him by his full name until he met his pint-sized rescuer. The use of his name now conveyed sympathy, which also etched itself in the wrinkled face and showed from the deep-set eyes under bristly eyebrows. And it was for more than the loss of his daughter’s childhood.

Tsealie knew well what Ray endured each day he existed without his wife, who was his partner in all things. They were physicists and university professors who’d been together since college. A single semester of chemistry was all it took for them to fall in love and they had been inseparable since. Both his girls would have been fascinated by this place. But he’d left them behind and the hole in his heart would not mend until he was with them again.

Ray refrained from rubbing his hand over that spot and returned to his report. “I heard another interesting piece of news,” he said with a note of suspense, then watched his friend’s face. “The king believes the man is after something called the Ruby of the Ancients. Do you know of this?”

To be continued…

Happy holidays

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